REV_8672

NoScope Gaming Glasses – Gimmick?

Professional gaming used to be a thing made fun of by most entertainment platforms. Back in the early 2000s, the only ones who dared broadcast high level competitive gaming was G4. Most “pro” gaming took place during LAN parties in organized events like the legendary, high-profile Doom deathmatch tourneys or the underground Super Smash Bros Melee matchups.

This is what large gaming tournaments used to look like.

This is what large gaming tournaments used to look like.

However, with the birth of online streaming sites like Twitch, everything changed. Suddenly, game development teams had an easy way to show off their top players. This sort of entertainment sees millions of hits across the world in everything from Super Smash Bros. to the stadium held events of League of Legends.

This is what they look like now. Image courtesy of PC Gamer.

This is what they look like now. Image courtesy of PC Gamer.

This is why there was a sudden increase in products that are meant to enhance a player’s skills. Razer builds top notch gaming mice, keyboards, and more. Astro makes super high-quality headsets for hearing the footsteps of unaware foes. All of these companies saw a need in the market and fulfilled it.

There is always some skepticism with these sort of products. A Razer mouse can cost at least $80, forcing one to question whether it will truly make one a better player. For most gamers, the difference is slight, but some folks swear by these accessories or companies.

Gaming eye-wear came into being from a simple problem. Gaming for long periods of time, whether training for a tournament match against a team of rivals or trying to get every star in Super Mario 64, hurts the eyes and can cause headaches. The solution? Yellow tinted lenses that filter out the harmful blue light of monitors.

Yes, it sounds like the kind of thing followed with, “Wait! There’s more! Act now and get a second pair free!”

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However, I decided to put these lenses to the test. To do so, I purchased a pair of moderately priced glasses from NoScope Gaming. I would love to compare them to their direct competition, Gunnar Glasses, but being as they are quite expensive I won’t be doing so.

First, I do like the build of the pair I bought, the Geminis. They are sturdy enough and come with a snappy pouch to keep them in and they look pretty stylish. I ended up picking up a hard case at a local eye doctor’s office to keep them safer though. You can purchase a warranty through the site, which does get you a case. Might be something I do with the next pair.

To start things off, I chose a game I’m likely to spend many hours at a time with, Smite. Smite is a competitive game, fitting in with the targeted audience of gaming glasses, so it made sense. With all of the flashy effects and quick camera movements, the game does have a tendency to give me some brain pains.

Yet, even after only a few hours of playing, I could feel that my eyes didn’t feel as strained. Of course, I spent almost 7-8 hours playing in total, but even in those first hours I could tell that these glasses were fairly effective. I also went on to play long periods of console games, handheld games, basically anything I was playing I threw on the glasses. I also tried a few sessions without, more times than not, I did get headaches for longer sessions.

Not only do I enjoy games, but I’m also a writer (surprise!) and spend a lot of time staring at a bright white screen. Even though the NoScope glasses are meant for gaming, anything that’s being done on a computer screen will benefit from wearing them. I even wear them at work, which is handy considering I edit sports clips, run news casts, and answer emails.

I did worry about games looking funny under a yellow tint, and yes it does seem weird. Luckily, the art direction isn’t skewed and the tint is slight enough that one can quickly get used to it. Basically, its not enough of deep yellow to throw off the style of the game.

Artistic games are treasures. I was worried gaming glasses would sully this.

Artistic games are treasures. I was worried gaming glasses would sully this.

Overall, the science behind gaming glasses isn’t really a new idea. Computer glasses have been in use for a while, but they weren’t specifically marketed to gamers until here recently. Most glasses companies have options for coatings to help those who use computers for long periods of time. Are gaming glasses¬†something that will instantly fix a problem? No, I wouldn’t use NoScope glasses or Gunnars if I thought there was a serious issue with my eyes. That’s what doctors are for.

So far though, from my use and tests, NoScope Glasses seem to be beneficial. Do I feel like I have an edge over opponents? Not really, but I do feel like I have better gaming stamina. My work is also a little less painful, and that alone is definitely worth the thirty bucks I spent to get them.

Functionality. Did a top brand make this shotgun? Who cares. Image courtesy of Rock Paper Shotgun.

Functionality. Did a top brand make this shotgun? Who cares. Image courtesy of Rock Paper Shotgun.

So what’s the difference between a cheaper brand and a more expensive one? Think about it like a pair of sunglasses. Sure, Oakley makes a sharp pair, but do you really want to spend more than a hundred on eye wear that isn’t prescription? For some, the brand, the design, and the slightly higher craftsmanship is worth it. Most just want to keep the sun out of their eyes, though.

I can honestly recommend NoScope Gaming Glasses. They’ve provided an excellent starting point for this sort of eyewear. Really, it’s hard to explain, so try it for yourself. They might be the coolest thing ever or they might not feel that great. Either way, worth a shot.

Note: NoScope did not sponsor this article. The author does have a sponsorship account with NoScope, but was not given any products for the purpose of this post.